No queen, no mound, no nest - and not all termites are bad news

Out collecting firewood on the weekend, we came across some very slow and dopey looking termites. 

Colder weather slows the termite activity right down, without them actually hibernating. 

NESTING: A wood-eating termite nest in a piece of common firewood. Colder weather slows the termite activity right down. Photo: Ruth Aveyard

NESTING: A wood-eating termite nest in a piece of common firewood. Colder weather slows the termite activity right down. Photo: Ruth Aveyard

Often termites, or white ants, are seen as an army of destruction eating through floor boards, support beams and architraves. However, the vast majority of termite species are grass-eating, performing an invaluable roll in the ecosystem.

Studies in Western Australia, by CSIRO, found properties with higher termite populations were also recording higher crop yields. 

Further investigation revealed termites increase biology activity in the soil profile creating tunnels deep into the earth, that were followed by roots of the cropped plant. Timber eating termites have an amazing ability to consume and digest wood, as part of the decomposition cycle. 

The vital ingredient for any successful termite community is the queen. No queen, no mound, no nest. 

  • Advice from Ruth Aveyard, 0447 242 474