Do you have a tree with a hollow in your back yard?

The sulphur-crested cockatoo is reliant on larger hollows in trees to nest and raise their young. Do you have one in your back yard?
The sulphur-crested cockatoo is reliant on larger hollows in trees to nest and raise their young. Do you have one in your back yard?

In our urban and agricultural areas large, hollow-bearing trees are in decline across the landscape and many species of native animals rely on tree hollows, for protection from predators, nesting and raising young.

In NSW hollow-dependent species include at least 46 mammals, 81 birds, 31 reptiles and 16 frogs.

Of these, 40 species are listed as threatened with extinction.

This is why the ‘loss of hollow-bearing trees’ has been listed as a key threatening process to biodiversity in the New South Wales landscape.

With your help this project aims to assess the availability of tree hollows and their use by wildlife across Australia.

Participating is easy – check the trees in your backyard, street, park, paddock or the bush, and report the hollow(s) through www.hollowsashomes.com on your phone or tablet.

The information you provide will be used to build a picture of the location, type and number of tree hollows across the country, as well as the wildlife using these hollows.

This information will be used to advise Councils’ plans to retain important habitat trees, plant future habitat trees and supplement missing habitat (e.g. small, medium or large hollows using nest boxes).

Hollows are important for birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, insects and spiders. Hollows as Homes wants to know about big and little hollows.

You can help by taking measurements of the tree, provide information about the hollow, and report wildlife using the hollow. Go to www.hollowsashomes.com.