$1.71 million for bridge replacement

Old timber bridges and concrete slab bridges will be replaced in the Upper Lachlan Shire at a total cost of $1.71 million.

Fifty per cent of the cost of the repairs and replacement of the Crookwell River Bridge on the Woodville Road at Crookwell, and the Diamond Creek Bridge on Kangaloolah Road at Binda will be funded by the Coalition Government through the Bridges Renewal Program. The remainder will be funded by the local government and allocated in the annual works program, director of infrastructure Mursaleen Shah said.

Bridge works: Diamond Creek Bridge on Kangaloolah Road will be replaced, while the bridge at Kiamma Creek at Harley Road remains closed. Photos: Clare McCabe.

Bridge works: Diamond Creek Bridge on Kangaloolah Road will be replaced, while the bridge at Kiamma Creek at Harley Road remains closed. Photos: Clare McCabe.

"The Crookwell River Bridge is an old slab concrete bridge from the 1930s," Hume MP Angus Taylor said.

"While there's a lot of history tied up in these bridges, they've passed their used-by date in terms of safety and efficiency."

In addition, the local government has allocated $200,000 from the works contingency reserve to fund the bridge replacement over Kiamma Creek at Harley Road in Crookwell.

The bridge was closed on April 8 following advice from consulting firm Pitt and Sherry that the bridge should be closed to all vehicles as a safety precaution.

Upper Lachlan Shire Mayor John Stafford said, that the upgrades to Diamond Creek and Crookwell River Bridges would help local farmers and freight operators.

"Replacement of these bridges will remove the pinch points for heavy vehicles, improving access to Main Road 54 and the M31 Highway, saving operators time and money," Cr Stafford said.

"The bridge replacements will also provide nearby residents with improved access to the village of Binda, as well as Crookwell and Goulburn," he said.

NRMA's Funding Local Roads report, released in January shows the regional and local roads infrastructure backlog in NSW increased by 30 per cent from $1.73 billion in 2014-15 to $2.2 billion in 2016-17.

"There has long been an urgent need for additional funding for rural and regional roads in NSW and it's been top of both the sector and the community's priority lists for many years," the Local Government NSW president, Cr Linda Scott, said.

"Wooden bridges are an important part of the economy, history and identity of many country towns and their maintenance shouldn't sit entirely on the shoulders of our councils."

In NSW, councils currently, own and manage 90 per cent of NSW's roads - about 166,000km of the total 185,000km road network; and about 1800 wooden bridges, some of which are more than 100 years old.