Local Leaders | Upper Lachlan Landcare: Habitat for smaller birds

Spectacular large flowering natives such as grevilleas, banksias and bottle brushes make a stunning garden display and certainly attract native birds like honey eaters.

Wattlebirds, noisy miners and other nectar feeding birds delight in the bounty provided by these plants.

However, smaller birds like wrens, robins, finches and thornbills can be driven away by these larger, often aggressive honeyeaters.

ENJOYING THE DISPLAY: Nikki Taws from Greening Australia recently led a Landcare bird watching morning near Dalton.

ENJOYING THE DISPLAY: Nikki Taws from Greening Australia recently led a Landcare bird watching morning near Dalton.

If you are looking for bird diversity in your garden, the answer lies in providing diversity of plants and habitat.

If you are looking for bird diversity in your garden, the answer lies in providing diversity of plants and habitat...Diversity supports diversity.

Along with nectar-rich, large flowering natives, also consider plants that will feed the insect and seed eaters. Insect attracting shrubs and wildflowers include feathery-leaved wattles, tea-trees, peas such as Daviesia sp., Indigofera sp. and Hardenbergia sp., and a variety of native daisies.

Seed eating birds like parrots, pigeons and finches will be attracted to gardens with tussock grasses, wallaby and kangaroo grass.

Finches will also use the grass stalks to build their nests.

Many of these native species can be sourced from local nurseries or Greening Australia in Canberra.

It is also worth considering ground habitat, especially for ground feeding birds such as thornbills.

Leaf litter, dead wood, rocks and mosses are all good places for them to forage for food and nesting materials.

A well-located and maintained birdbath will be well used by birds also.

Diversity supports diversity, and allows you to sit back and enjoy bird watching from the relaxing comfort of your own garden.

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