Southern Tablelands residents invited to help end 'forced' organ harvesting

Alison Wang is a Falun Dafa Association volunteer who gained signatures in Moss Vale. Photo: supplied.
Alison Wang is a Falun Dafa Association volunteer who gained signatures in Moss Vale. Photo: supplied.

Organ harvesting of what could be up to 100,000 people annually will become a topic of discussion in the Southern Tablelands.

Volunteers from the Falun Dafa Association will be raising awareness at several locations at different times on Saturday May 1.

Petioners from the Falun Dafa Association will be at IGA in Crookwell from 9am-4pm, the Merino Cafe in Gunning from 1pm-3pm, and the corner of Bunnaby and Orchard Street from 9am-11am in Taralga.

It follows volunteers petitioning against the Chinese Communist Party's actions (CCP) in Mittagong, Moss Vale and Bowral last weekend.

Volunteers successfully gained 789 signatures from last week's event.

"We really appreciate that so many locals signed the petition and expressed their support for the campaign," said Falun Dafa Association volunteer Diana Hoosen.

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Ms Hoosen said organ harvesting was being condemned in China, with animosity gaining momentum worldwide.

"The petition is a way to tell the CCP that lots of people do not support their actions," she said.

The End CCP Petition has currently gained over 858,000 signatures.

Min Chen interacted with a local in Bowral. Photo: supplied.

Min Chen interacted with a local in Bowral. Photo: supplied.

Ms Hoosen is hoping that the petition can have an impact on a practice that she said "is not something you can see directly."

The Independent Tribunal into Forced Organ Harvesting from Prisoners of Conscience in China reported that the CCP estimated that 10,000 transplants take place every year.

The tribunal noted that the government say "now that their transplant volumes are all coming from donations."

The tribunal is "convinced that official Chinese transplantation statistics have been falsified."

The tribunal also reported that it did further investigation and found it could be 60,000 or as much as 100,000 transplants each year.

"We will never know the true figure," Ms Hoosen said.

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